Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Egg sizes and shapes
#16
I didn't realise that the length etc played a part in it. Having said that one of my previous girls used to lay long thin ones when she first came into lay. That's how I knew whose they were ~ once she'd go into the swing of things they were just like the others ~ egg shaped
Reply
#17
Thank you for straightening that one out Summayah, I was wondering!



Zoe, do you have a good reason for Barbara's name?



I hope you don't let on to the chooks, we wouldn't want to give the chooks an identity crisis :eek:
Reply
#18
No, no good reason it just suited him :o
Reply
#19
Yes according to 'Table Poultry Production' by Murray Hale and John Ogier - "The shape and teture of the egg affect hatchability more than any other factor"



But it doesnt say why - I'm assuming wth the thin ones its because the chick doesnt have enough room to rotate and peck its way out. The fat ones, I quess they dont have enough room to stretch out lengthways, I mean, they're cramped as it is so if you have a short fat egg and a chick programmed genetically to grow to a certain size, there's problems!
Reply
#20
That's very interesting. One set of my eggs were slightly slimmer than the others. All the eggs came from a number of girls, so I'm now hoping that's just the way that breed is.
Reply
#21
Quite a few of my welbars lay eggs that sort of shape
Reply
#22
Yes, you're right some of those were slimmer too, thinking about it.
Reply
#23
Some breeds might just be like that and be fine, maybe the chicks start off small and make up for the growth once out of the egg?
Reply
#24
Yes I'm sure you're right, I hope so.
Reply
#25
[quote name='TradBritFowlCo']Some breeds might just be like that and be fine, maybe the chicks start off small and make up for the growth once out of the egg?[/quote]



That is what I have been told will happen on the Cambars - the genetics make the bird grow to it's size, not the size of the egg
Reply
#26
Yes, I remember in the beginning you were a bit unsure about the size of the eggs your girls were producing for hatching. But it seems to be working just fine. How old is the first boy ~ woudl it be possible for him to go in with the 4 you just hatched, or not?
Reply
#27
[quote name='Zoë']the genetics make the bird grow to it's size, not the size of the egg[/quote]



Thats a problem if you breed ur birds bigger but dont increase egg size - they're too big to hatch!
Reply
#28
Except surely your bigger birds would be laying a bigger egg but now I've said that my orpington lays little eggs so I wouldn't hatch from those :confused:
Reply
#29
yes but if you select for bigger sized birds in your flock, but dont select the hens that lay bigger eggs to breed from too, you'll be getting genentically big chicks from the same size eggs the breed lays - if you see what i mean? but maybe the chicks would be the same at hatching and then do their growing later on? I've heard both accounts! very confusing!



I know that they once experimented by getting a shetland pregnant to a shire (AI!) and she gave birth to a normal shetland sized foal that grew to be HUGE. Is it the same principle with eggs.



Maybe the cambars do it naturally but others wouldnt?
Reply
#30
An interesting theory, I wonder if anyone else has seen this happen with their chickens
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)