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Dispatching!
#1
Hi all!
Dispatching is something not any of us a really happy to do..it's an operation that must be done competently and quickly.
If you have any doubt whatever, find someone or a vet competent/experienced/willing to perform the operation.
After performing this operation for myself many times and others, using the traditional snapping neck method, I wanted to find a more clinical method of carrying out the operation.I have heard of and. seen different methods over the years. Not all to my liking, so therefore I wanted to improve the method, for the bird and myself.

I find the best time is at night (dark), catching and handling birds is much easier, but not always possible, as some need to be attended to right away. I now use a humane dispatcher, which look like a pair of pliers. Place over the neck to the base of the skull, and press firmly down on the dispatcher, tilting the head back and hold in place for a few seconds. The spinal cord is snapped and it's all over. Touch the eye on the bird to look for a reaction...then you'll know that the deed is done.
I know one member one here may put a photo of the pliers up to see...you can buy them off ebay.
All the best!
Spur
Spur Big Grin 
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#2
I hate dispatching but I know it needs to be done - whether for an elderly or sick bird or too many cockerels. I've heard of different methods - swinging round by the neck  Confused , the broomstick method (which I wasn't confident enough to try, but seems a popular choice), or by chopping off the head....

I got Spur round - and he showed me his dispatchers - must say it was very quick an effective - wondered if anyone else has seen these? I've yet to try it myself, but it's looking like I might need to soon.....

Here is a pic of Spurs Humane Game Dispatcher -     Has anyone else tried one of these? I was worried that the head would be 'chopped off' but these don't close completely    
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#3
I have a pair somewhere but really didnt like them,my handstrength is not what it was and i failed to get enought pressure with one bird..never again.
I much prefer the broomstick method,i know i wont fail with that.
Its down to personal choice,if you have a strong grip then these are ok.
Patterdales..there is no doubt they are addictive,therein lies the danger.While living with lots,you will grow poorer and stranger. dog run K9
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#4
DEFRA doesn't like these:

"5.7 No attempt should be made to kill a bird by crushing its neck, e.g. with pliers. Crushing the neck is neither quick nor humane and it does not have the same effect as dislocation of the neck."

Full document is here. https://www.gov.uk/guidance/farm-animal-...-slaughter
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
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#5
Interesting to read DEFRA's viewpoint. I got the impression, with the humane dispatcher, that it was more used to grip the neck while the body was lifted up - thus dislocating the neck rather than crushing it. I would say they are best used in experienced hands - or someone that has been taught.
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#6
There is  a wall/ fence post mounted type  dispatcher too.  Smile
CHUCKLERS RULE THE ROOST - Dave. Zen Seeker of The Board. rabbit run
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#7
I asked my vet how they would dispatch a chicken. He said they would inject via a vein under the wing, but they have to think of the appearance of the bird if the owner wants to take it away. He felt that neck dislocation (eg broomstick method) was probably better in its rapidity. It ought to pull the brain-stem out of the brain and cause instant death, which is also not DEFRA's view.
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
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#8
(22-11-2015, 02:52 PM)Sutty Wrote: I asked my vet how they would dispatch a chicken. He said they would inject via a vein under the wing, but they have to think of the appearance of the bird if the owner wants to take it away. He felt that neck dislocation (eg broomstick method) was probably better in its rapidity. It ought to pull the brain-stem out of the brain and cause instant death, which is also not DEFRA's view.

That says a bit about DEFRA methinks? The broomstick methods seems to be popular although I haven't tried this.
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#9
It comes down to technique and wether you are fully comfortable with things.
What works for one, might not work for another.
These pliers used in the correct manner snap the spinal cord. It's instant. That is why I prefer them above all methods I have used/seen over the years.
Atb
Spur Big Grin 
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#10
Do you remember when I had a chicken pts at vets and it took ages for it to die. Horrid. Anyway brought it home and thought I would try the broomstick method on a dead chicken, still couldnt do it Sad
It never worries me when I get a little lost, all I do is change where I'm going
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#11
I have used the broomstick method successfully a few times but now use the "gamekeeper friend and a bottle of scotch" method. He is far more experienced than I am. In an emergency I am confident that I could dispatch quickly to put a distressed bird out of it's agony though.
Today is the First Day of the rest of our lives.
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#12
No problem with the pliers thing if it works OK.
Broomstick method works well, just don't be cautious about foot pressure, as this stops the bird's head from pulling out under the broomstick.
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
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