Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Prolapse
#1
One of my SLW pullets has prolapsed trying to lay her first egg.  The egg was still enclosed within the prolapse and so it was really difficult not to mention yeuk! trying to remove the egg and put the prolapse back.  The prolapse came back out after an hour or so but not so much so I cleaned her up and put it back again and then put her to bed.  It's back out again this morning againu not as much.  Anyone got any suggestions ?  I was going to put it back in again, then separate her and on to antibiotics but I'm not sure how many times I should do this really.  Anyone had success or should I just put her down.  She seems ok in herself at the moment, eating and drinking and apparently unaware that anything is wrong.
I never make the same mistake twice. I do it at least five or six times, just to make sure !

Reply
#2
Ive never had this happen so i cant really help.Sorry.
I think if she is happy in herself then carry on a while longer for today.
Patterdales..there is no doubt they are addictive,therein lies the danger.While living with lots,you will grow poorer and stranger. dog run K9
Reply
#3
My daughter had it happen, and she got it to stay back (well a friend did it)and it stayed put and she started laying again ok. As she is young, I think I would persevere. good luck
It never worries me when I get a little lost, all I do is change where I'm going
Reply
#4
Have put it back in this morning and used Anusol piles cream (as suggested on a poultry care website). Should help to shrink the whole thing back with any luck - poor hen, very stressed by the all the invasive handling. She's now separated in a small, warm, cosy coop. No access to food or water for most of today to allow her insides to settle down and also so that when I do allow her some water, she is thirsty and drinks up all her antibiotics. Fingers crossed, such a lovely looking girlie.
I never make the same mistake twice. I do it at least five or six times, just to make sure !

Reply
#5
You are doing all you can April..fingers crossed for her,im sure we have had past members use h-cream for this.
Patterdales..there is no doubt they are addictive,therein lies the danger.While living with lots,you will grow poorer and stranger. dog run K9
Reply
#6
We had a little Brahma who prolapsed with her first egg. When I had a couple of tries to put it back and it still came out again I reluctantly culled her. Still not sure today whether I did the right thing though.
Today is the First Day of the rest of our lives.
Reply
#7
I've had success with piles cream with Rita, my mad as a bag if frogs wyandotte. Hope it works for you. A sugar poultice might also work, draws out excess liquid so shrinks the protrusion.
If they can be taught to hate, they can be taught to love.
Reply
#8
Interesting post. Is it obvious when they've had a prolapse? One of my Plymouth Rocks laid her first egg two days ago, and I noticed blood on it, but didn't think any more of it. I put it down to her being a newbie. Should I look more closely?
Reply
#9
You would realise straight away Scotsfran. Their innards become their outards, it looks as though they have a bloody (as in blood, not swearing)  mass bulging out of them. I have kept chickens for years and have only had the one who prolapsed.
Today is the First Day of the rest of our lives.
Reply
#10
there is a device for sheep to keep the uterus in place once a prolaspe has been corrected.Someone should make one for chickens ?
Patterdales..there is no doubt they are addictive,therein lies the danger.While living with lots,you will grow poorer and stranger. dog run K9
Reply
#11
(19-02-2016, 10:33 AM)k9crystal Wrote: there is a device for sheep to keep the uterus in place once a prolaspe has been corrected.Someone should make one for chickens ?

Hummmm....great for sheep but they don't lay eggs....... Dodgy Cry
Today is the First Day of the rest of our lives.
Reply
#12
a lot of farmers just sew the opening up with bailer twine to keep the prolapse in eeek. But I know what you mean there is a device, I remember hearing of a ewe that managed to lamb through it!

April its definitely worth a go, you have nothing to lose as long as the hen isnt in discomfort....
It never worries me when I get a little lost, all I do is change where I'm going
Reply
#13
If you are happy to use a vet there is a hormonal product available (often used in parrots etc) which will stop her producing eggs for a while. This may be useful while it all settles down.
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
Reply
#14
Having put the prolapse back in several times (where it stays only temporarily), keeping her separate and giving her antibiotics, the prolapse is still partially out but much smaller and dried up (so to speak). It's not bloody and invisible due to her fluffy bum feathers. She can go to the loo apparently perfectly normally. She is happy as larry and appears to be in good health so I've decided to let her rejoin the flock and see what happens next time she attempts to lay an egg (if she does). Don't really know if this is the right thing to do but feel really mean bumping her off if there are no adverse effects to having a partial prolapse - have to wait and see.
I never make the same mistake twice. I do it at least five or six times, just to make sure !

[-] The following 1 user Likes april's post:
  • auntsally
Reply
#15
Please to hear she seems to have improved April. Hopefully it will sort itself out before she comes back into lay.
You've only got one life - live it!
squizzers
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)