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Canker
#1
I currently have a cream legbar (my oldest bird), who has developed what I am pretty certain is canker. She just looked a bit unwell for a day or two, then was gaping and not eating well, with lumps visible in her throat. I dislodged the biggest lump which perked up her eating and breathing (apparently if you do this too early it can cause bleeding). I started her on metronidazole tablets a couple of days ago 200mg once a day, and she is looking Much much perkier. There is still a smaller lump just behind one side of her lower beak, which I may try to gently dislodge when I dose her again tonight.
Researching online I have found various doses and treatments. Metronidazole seems to be 40 to 60mg per Kg body weight for 5 to 14 days, depending what you read.
I had another bird who died from this a few years ago (I thought she had a tumour in her throat), and I realised what it was when another developed it a couple of years ago. Sadly I realised rather late and she died too. I'm hoping Emily pull through this - she seems to be responding well. When I initially looked in her mouth it looked rather like she had a big food lump stuck.
Has anyone else experienced this disease? Quite a few photos available online.
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
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#2
Hi,
Not come across this! What is the cause?
I hope this clears up.
Atb
Spur Big Grin 
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#3
I've never heard of it in chickens. Interesting.
If they can be taught to hate, they can be taught to love.
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#4
It is apparently fairly common in pigeons and doves, and chickens can catch it from eating food or drinking water with them - seems to be transmitted in saliva. It is caused by a "motile protozoan" i.e. a microscopic protozoa organism that can swim. The main causative organism is called trichomonas gallinae, related to, but not the same as, the trichomonas species that causes a sexually transmitted disease in humans (and this one doesn't affect humans).
If you have a bird with a lump or lumps in its mouth or throat (usually yellowish lumps looking inside), it is likely to be canker. If left untreated birds can asphyxiate or starve to death as it can block the airway or oesophagus.
Seems to be a problem for pigeon keepers more than us chicken folk. Maybe I am just unlucky in having some infected wild birds in my area.
Emily is still improving at the moment, I'm planning to carry on treatment for at least a week.
Wilipedia link here
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
[-] The following 1 user Likes Sutty's post:
  • chickenmum
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#5
Very interesting Sutty - though sorry for your Emily. I learn something new everyday!
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#6
Emily is looking well, eating and drinking and very lively. The canker lesion in the floor of her mouth came away tonight with a bit of massage when I dosed her with metronidazole tonight. Hopefully she will continue her recovery!
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
[-] The following 2 users Like Sutty's post:
  • scotsfran, auntsally
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#7
Nope, one thing i havnt had.................... Hope Emily continues to improve
It never worries me when I get a little lost, all I do is change where I'm going
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#8
Would it be possible to post information in our reference bit on how to treat canker? Having said that I cannot find it at the moment.
Today is the First Day of the rest of our lives.
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#9
(06-04-2016, 08:33 AM)auntsally Wrote: Would it be possible to post information in our reference bit on how to treat canker?  Having said that I cannot find it at the moment.

Good idea - will do! I'll pin it to the top of this page.
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#10
Yes I've seen that on some of the American sights looks awful, luckily I've never had to deal with it did you tease the sores off with a cotton bud or something? Did she let you open her mouth alright?
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#11
Glad Emily is improving Sutty. Not had that problem thankfully
You've only got one life - live it!
squizzers
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#12
(06-04-2016, 12:36 PM)buffybuffy Wrote: Yes I've seen that on some of the American sights looks awful, luckily I've never had to deal with it did you tease the sores off with a cotton bud or something? Did she let you open her mouth alright?

The biggest lump (small marble sized) I massaged from outside as it was a visible lump pushing out, I could then push it towards her beak and get hold of it to dislodge it. The second one was in the floor of mouth and loosened after a few days treatment, I could then dislodge it with a teaspoon handle. I knelt on the floor with her wedged beteen my knees (facing out) so could hold her head/beak with one hand and use the other to dose her and dislodge the lump. Apparently they can get lumps in the crop too that can me dislodged from outside after treatment.
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
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#13
Hi Sutty,
It's been a few weeks and I was just wondering if your hen has recovered well from the canker??
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#14
She brightened up and improved a lot, eating OK etc, and I completed a 10 day course of metronidazole, but iy seems to have come back - or rather the lump under her tongue to the side of her mouth has got worse again pushing out the side of her mouth/face so she looks like she's got the mumps on one side. I started the metronidazole again a few days ago, and yesterday gave her a big dose of carnidazole (Spartrix) sold for pigeons. I'm starting to wonder if it is something else, apparently there are some other things that can look like canker.
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
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