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Petrol Strimmer
#1
Morning all



We have a patch of land that a neighbour with a field lets us use the corner of to plant vegetables. We have it laid up like an allotment with beds for veg with strips of grass in between to walk around in. Previously I have used a strimmer which I charge up but it was a cheap one and the charge has slowly been decreasing until it is now no longer useable.



We are absolutely useless with mechanical stuff – changing a bulb is a challenge to us so we don’t want anything too complicated! I would like one that both myself and my husband could use. I am 5ft and he is 6ft 2 so ideally it would be adjustable and quite light.



Anyone have one that fits this description. I have been looking on the internet but I just really don't know what is good and what is not. Are there certain things that I should be looking for in a petrol strimmer? Any advice greatly appreciated.



Cheers
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#2
I think any of the major brands would be ok. Not sure you need any adjustment apart from the shoulder strap. Some strimmers come apart half-way up the shaft which makes storage easier, and enables you to use other attachments. But make sure any attachment kit you might want to use is compatible with the strimmer brand you buy. I got a JCB petrol strimmer recently, which works fine, but JCB isn't on the "compatible" list of the multi-attachment system B&Q sell (though it might still work).
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
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#3
You definitely need one with a harness as petrol strimmers aren't exactly light. We have a McCullouch - starts every time, even after storage over winter. You should also have goggles and ear protectors.
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#4
Thanks. I have been looking through Argos and see this one (see below). This cost £124. It says nothing about a harness. Does one buy this separately or is it only the more expensive that come with a harness. Can you buy 2 stroke oil at the garage? Is it expensive? Do you use much? I hadn't heard of McCulloch before - is this the leader for petrol strimmers? Do you think something of this price would be good enough for the land I described before? What attachments could you buy? Sorry I really know nothing about these and any advice is very much appreciated.



McCulloch Petrol Grass Trimmer - 22cc.

The McCulloch Petrol Grass Trimmer features a powerful, low weight full crank 22cc engine with low noise technology ideal for residential areas. Its split shaft allows for the use of multi-attachments (sold separately) and for easy storage and transportation.



Petrol grass trimmer.

22cc engine.

2 stroke engine.

Requires 2 stroke oil.

Cutting width of 43cm.

Bump feed.

Dual line feed system.

2 handled design.

Adjustable handle.

2 piece shaft.

Safety guard.

Switch on lock.

Interchangeable spools.

Low vibration.

Suitable for all gardens.

Lightweight and easy to use.

Weight 4.4kg.

EAN/MPN/UPC/ISBN: 739173696780-8.
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#5
I have a Ryobi petrol strimmer and although it's not light, with a harness it is fine for using - I have used it up to an hour at a time
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#6
I've never seen a strimmer that isn't supplied with a shoulder strap - it just take the weight off your hands and makes it easier to swing when cutting.



McCulloch have certainly been around a while and are a well established player in petrol-driven garden tools, that said I suspect they are not the top end products (probably stihl as they aim at professional use). Spare parts would probably be easy to get if you needed anything.



The bump-feed for the strimmer line makes it easy, but you will have to replace the line eventually.



Other attachments can be brushcutters, hedgecutters, rotivators, blowers, etc.



2-stroke oil is easy to get, many garages will sell it, also found at DIY stores. You usually mix it with petrol at about 40:1 ie 1 part oil to 40 petrol, but some engines use different ratios. You can get a plastic bottle with lines so that you fill with petrol to the litre line and then add oil to the appropriate line to give the right mix - much easier. Oil is not expensive.



If you use it a lot you will eventually need to change the spark plug, but that is easy enough.



Personally if you are looking at more than one model I'd tend to go for larger engines as other attachments may use more power (heavier though).



I'd never go back to an electric strimmer or chainsaw: cordless have heavy batteries and run down just when you want them, and corded the cord is always getting snagged and has potential for damage.



Eye protection is a good idea, mine is not loud enough to really need ear protection.
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
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#7
I can't remember if mine came with a strap or not but if it did it must have been a poor one because I have now got a lovely bright yellow harness with padding for the shoulder that I bought seperately - it takes some of the weight off my arms and onto my back for when I will be using it for quite a long period of time
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#8
I have a mcCulloch works great, i can recommend them.
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#9
I have a Honda , great bit of kit starts easily , never missed a beat in 5 years and we use it alot. Don't buy cheap crap from B&Q and the like, they won't last 5 mins and be uneconomical to repair when they go wrong.
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#10
[quote name='Yosemite Sam' date='30 June 2012 - 10:51 PM' timestamp='1341093062' post='261392']

I have a Honda , great bit of kit starts easily , never missed a beat in 5 years and we use it alot. Don't buy cheap crap from B&Q and the like, they won't last 5 mins and be uneconomical to repair when they go wrong.

[/quote]



How much would you say one would have to spend before not buying the "cheap crap"? What would you say was the minimum cc I should buy?



Thanks everyone for replies so far - it is all very enlightening and will help us decide what to buy.
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#11
[quote name='Sparky' date='02 July 2012 - 08:54 AM' timestamp='1341215652' post='261450']

How much would you say one would have to spend before not buying the "cheap crap"? What would you say was the minimum cc I should buy?



Thanks everyone for replies so far - it is all very enlightening and will help us decide what to buy.

[/quote]



Its the same with anthing , you get what you pay for. If your going to use it alot and want it to last for along time then get a more expensive one . Some of the cheap ones have chinese engines in them that won't last well and then to get spare will be impossible. I have on of these , a Honda UMK 435 , they also do a 425 but this has a smaller engine . You need the model with the big wide handlebars , which are easier to work with and you get a harness with it and also a blade as well as the normal nylon cord.They have a 4 stroke engine which means you just pour straight petrol in it , so no mixing of oil.

They do a model with a small handlebar , but this has no harness and will break your back.


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#12
Can't help, but am interested in what people recommend. We have just one of those stupid things with plastic wire, never works, the plastic thing flies off or runs out. I even find that heavy too <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/sad.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Sad' />
It never worries me when I get a little lost, all I do is change where I'm going
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#13
[quote name='Teazel' date='08 July 2012 - 09:52 AM' timestamp='1341737523' post='261775']

Can't help, but am interested in what people recommend. We have just one of those stupid things with plastic wire, never works, the plastic thing flies off or runs out. I even find that heavy too <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/sad.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Sad' />

[/quote]



Most have the plastic cord Gran , but some are better than others and the quality of the plastic cord will make a difference. Get one of those Honda's they are as light as can be expected and with adjustable handlebars and harness you can adjust it so the balance is just right and it will make life alot easier.
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#14
[quote name='Yosemite Sam' date='08 July 2012 - 04:24 PM' timestamp='1341761088' post='261786']

Most have the plastic cord Gran , but some are better than others and the quality of the plastic cord will make a difference. Get one of those Honda's they are as light as can be expected and with adjustable handlebars and harness you can adjust it so the balance is just right and it will make life alot easier.

[/quote]





Oi, LADY TEAZEL to you.............. will look into the Honda, thanks
It never worries me when I get a little lost, all I do is change where I'm going
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#15
[quote name='Teazel' date='08 July 2012 - 08:51 PM' timestamp='1341777071' post='261807']

Oi, LADY TEAZEL to you.............. will look into the Honda, thanks

[/quote]



Sorry your majesty <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':lol:' />
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