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Can you tell who's egg it is by weight?
#1
Yesterday, I had the teeniest little egg in the nest box, so I've done a bit of a study (since i've got to get the hang of eating eggs again, there's loads on the kitchen windowsill).

I know which eggs are Doris's and Edna's, my older girls, by the colours, and so it goes like this....



Doris's eggs - between 81 and 85 grams

Edna's eggs - between 72 and 75 grams

New girls egg - between 62 and 65 grams (i think these are norma's)

New girls egg - between 55 and 58 grams (i think blanche's eggs)



And yesterday's teeny tiny egg - just 44 grams <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/wub.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':wub:' /> so cute!

So I think this is Violet's first egg, but in all honesty I may be wrong.



What do you think to my new theory?

Haven't mentioned this theory to OH as yet as I think he'll have me locked away!!



Em x



PS Are Brahma's supposed to lay such teeny eggs, the birds are mahoosive!!
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#2
Other will be able to give a better answer than this, but first eggs are often quite small. To a reasonable degree of accuracy you can tell who's laid an egg by its size, also colour, shape, shell texture etc etc - if you know your hens well enough!
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#3
Wow, you have very accurate scales there. Maybe I could get a pair as mine are on their way out.



I can only tell Maggie's eggs, Rita's and Peggy's eggs apart. Maggie's are always speckled with brown bits, Rita lays hers in a totally different place to the rest and Peggs only lays every so often and her's are massive with a wee swirly bit on the end.



I guess though that they must lay similar sized eggs their whole life depending on their reproductive system? What always amazes me is the relative size of the yolk in the bantie eggs compared to their size, they are massive!
If they can be taught to hate, they can be taught to love.
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#4
yep Brahmas are known for poor conversion rate - laying a smaller egg compared to the amount of feed they eat for their huge body size <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Smile' />

The lighter weight breeds tend to have the better conversion rates - Leghorn, Ancona, Freisian smaller birds, less feed, huge eggs.
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#5
I have always known whose eggs are whose, but then all my girls are different breeds and sizes, I imagine if you have 2or more girls that are same breed and size it could get confusing.
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#6
I have weighed aggs too, and noted they have got bigger as the girls have got older, starting quite small. Day to day variation seems to be only a gram or so though so it may work for you (I can tell mine apart anyway)
Never forget that life is a finite resource.

Experience is something you gain just after you needed it most.
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#7
I'm with Sutty on this one. First eggs are almost always small and if they are not, I find they are often double with 2 smaller yolks. I doubt that a chicken's first egg will be the larger ones. Good luck!
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