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Interesting dispatch method
#16
Gosh this is giving me the heebie jeepies <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/ohmy.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':o' /> It does sound as if the neck dislocation is the most humane method, so what happens if you try and do that and pull the head off by mistake, does that count as neck dislocation or decapitation <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/unsure.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':unsure:' /> Wish I had a brain <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/blink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='blink' /> Its a good discussion tho, coz we have to think about these things and owe it to our birds to do the best by them. Actually having read your post more carefully CC it sounds as if the neck was dislocated before the head was pulled off then the bird would be unconscious so that should be ok.





I keep thinking about all those poor people guillotined in France
It never worries me when I get a little lost, all I do is change where I'm going
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#17
[quote name='Ross Clarke' date='26 May 2011 - 08:05 AM' timestamp='1306393509' post='235326']

i agree choccy, i regard that its paramount that the bird feels no pain and it is done quick, efficently and accuratly. Its our responsibility and duty.



I feel that if this air pistol method could be explained by someone who uses it or has seen it in practise then maybe more people would feel at ease with dispatching.



I am sure people do not dispatch simply down to the 'very hands on' methods that are commonly used. For example, my missus does not like dispatching by hand, she constantly feels she will mess it up and she does not like the 'hands on' killing. However, i asked her last night about this air pistol method, and she said she would be quite happy to try it - providing she was shown what to do.



If people started using this method then maybe we would have less 'dumped' lads.

[/quote]



I agree with this, I think I could shoot something, then you are slightly dissociated from it. The gun has done the killing, not you
If they can be taught to hate, they can be taught to love.
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#18
[quote name='Ross Clarke' date='26 May 2011 - 08:05 AM' timestamp='1306393509' post='235326']

i agree choccy, i regard that its paramount that the bird feels no pain and it is done quick, efficently and accuratly. Its our responsibility and duty.



I feel that if this air pistol method could be explained by someone who uses it or has seen it in practise then maybe more people would feel at ease with dispatching.



I am sure people do not dispatch simply down to the 'very hands on' methods that are commonly used. For example, my missus does not like dispatching by hand, she constantly feels she will mess it up and she does not like the 'hands on' killing. However, i asked her last night about this air pistol method, and she said she would be quite happy to try it - providing she was shown what to do.



If people started using this method then maybe we would have less 'dumped' lads.

[/quote]



Well said Ross <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Smile' /> .



I don't feel overly comfortable with the idea of breaking a neck: I haven't had to, and would rather not.

I was just discussing this thread with my husband, and he said obviously he would rather do it the quickest, easiest way: for us, that will probably be by the bullet.
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#19
I must admit I have always taken my chooks to the vet for termination, I have no idea what the french method is, my vet explained the broomstick method, which I found repulsive. By the way if anyone is thinking "what a wimp" I was in Special Forces for 9 and half years. So whilst not being entirely "sanitised" I have respect for life animal or human, and would love to think there is a PROVEN pain free termination. What is the french method Ross?
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#20
the french method is when a small scalpel is inserted into the mouth after the bird has been stunned and slits a vein or artery in the roof of the mouth, bleeding the bird to death rapidly. This is also one of the methods used in our farming system.
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