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Storing eggs for the winter
#1
I asked a friend if she knew any old style ways of keeping eggs longer. She pulled out a copy of Mrs. Beaton's Household Management book - it said to immerse in water-glass or silicate of soda.



Googled silicate of soda and it sounds like a corrosive chemical.



Anyone ever tried this?
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#2
No, I havent heard of this but I was once in a supermarket behind this man who was buying lots of boxes of cheap eggs and reduced stuff (loaves of value bread 10p and unmarked cans 5p each!)and he told the lady at the till that he covered eggs in soft white paraffin (unbranded vasaline) and they kept for months. He is a skipper apparently and goes around emptying skips behing supermarkets for food!
If they can be taught to hate, they can be taught to love.
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#3
They were stored like [url="http://pilgrim.ceredigion.gov.uk/index.cfm?articleid=2721"]this[/url] <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Smile' />
CHUCKLERS RULE THE ROOST - Dave. Zen Seeker of The Board. rabbit run
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#4
I can remember my mum having a huge tin bath under the kitchen table with eggs in water glass. She was keeping them for use during winter.
You've only got one life - live it!
squizzers
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#5
Eggs in fish gelatine stuff? Ugh! Thank heavens we don't have to do that nowadays <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Smile' />
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#6
[quote name='Squizzers' date='01 April 2011 - 07:30 PM' timestamp='1301682644' post='228933']

I can remember my mum having a huge tin bath under the kitchen table with eggs in water glass. She was keeping them for use during winter.

[/quote]



Yes, we used to do that, too.
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#7
can't ye just boil and pickle um and have egg sandwhiches all winter
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#8
I wouldn't go on the say so of Mrs Beaton. I've got an original of that book off a friend who collects old stuff and there's a recipe in there for guinea pig!!
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#9
I beat them up with, freeze them in ice cube trays (making a note of how many ice cubes make one egg). Once frozen Pop them into bags labelled with the details and date, they'll see you all through winter for cakes pancakes omlettes flans Lamost all egg dishes apart from fried/poached egg. I even seperate a few eggwhites and yolks for custard and meringue making. <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/wink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Wink' />
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#10
Wow Goldilocks! I would never have though of freezing eggs like that. <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/blink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='blink' />
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#11
I beat them up and freeze them either with salt for savoury or sugar for sweet dishes, and my mum always used glass water to store eggs <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Smile' />
It never worries me when I get a little lost, all I do is change where I'm going
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#12
[quote name='chicknthings' date='16 April 2011 - 07:14 PM' timestamp='1302977653' post='230519']

I wouldn't go on the say so of Mrs Beaton. I've got an original of that book off a friend who collects old stuff and there's a recipe in there for guinea pig!!

[/quote]

oh yum.... <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/huh.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Huh' />
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