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hatching eggs?
#1
hi



i am new at takeing care of chickens



and if i got a hen and a cockerel and they made a hatching egg

will the hen lay more hatching when she is siting on it the first or will just lay the one egg





thanks
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#2
She'll keep laying till she has a decent number to sit on.
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#3
[quote name='danpug' date='18 November 2010 - 07:25 PM' timestamp='1290108313' post='214928']

She'll keep laying till she has a decent number to sit on.

[/quote]



thanks mate and if there is a hen in one of the eggs can it make a hatching egg with the cockerel they mated with her mum or do you need a diff one
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#4
I think we need to start at the begining Jason! Welcome by the way.



Most hens will lay a 'clutch' of eggs usually about 10 to 12 before they go broody - that's what we call it when the hen decides she is going to sit on her eggs and hatch them. Not all hens go broody by the way!



If you have a cockerel with your girls and he is doing his job and the eggs are fertile, they will hatch out in about 21 days. There will be about 50% girls and 50% boys. You probably won't know which is which until they have grown up a fair bit, say out six to eight weeks.



If you hatch any girls, then yes they can be put back to their dad, but shouldn't be put to their brothers.



How many chickens have you got? Remember too, that you don't have to have a cockerel in order to get eggs from your hens. Hopes this helps.
You've only got one life - live it!
squizzers
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#5
thank you some much but if i get a cockerel in one of the egg do i have to give it away because it will fight with the the main corkerel or can i keep them
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#6
Or you can eat them when they are big enough ...
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#7
[quote name='jason180sx' date='18 November 2010 - 07:50 PM' timestamp='1290109854' post='214939']

thank you some much but if i get a cockerel in one of the egg do i have to give it away because it will fight with the the main corkerel or can i keep them

[/quote]

You could keep the young boys, but you would need to keep them seperately from the main cock because otherwise they will fight when the youngster becomes interested in the females. Do you live in a rural area, because cocks crow and can cause problems with the neighbours!
You've only got one life - live it!
squizzers
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#8
Hi, I've never tried hatching eggs but I'm fairly sure someone told me that fertility rates go down in the winter and that hens tend not to go broody in the winter too.



We have 4 hens and have only had 1 go broody and she got fed up with sitting after a few days. From what I understand certain breeds are more likely to be broody than others.



Good luck.
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#9
Hi, welcome to the forum. I've just read your earlier post, when you said that you've just got your first two hens today and they're called Sophie and Rose. I'm assuming from the names that you've got two hens, not a hen and a cockerel, so any eggs will obviously be infertile even if one of your hens goes broody. Are you intending getting a cockerel to go with them?
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#10
Hatching is fun BUT you need to be prepared to kill your young cockerals unless you know in advance that you have a good reliable home for any you may hatch. Somewhere there is a really good post on the responsibility of hatching. With any luck the mods will know where it is and point you in the right direction. Having said that as long as you are sure of how you will handle the cockerals it is fantastic to see the tiny little chicks learning from their mum how to be chickens.
Today is the First Day of the rest of our lives.
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#11
[url="http://www.poultrychat.com/forum/index.php?/topic/9189-want-to-hatch-think-again-please/"]HERE[/url] is the link that Aunt Sally is talking about.
You've only got one life - live it!
squizzers
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#12
Jason, was there a cockrel in the pen when you picked up your chickens? Please someone who knows, isnt't it something like the hen will have fertilised eggs for some days after leaving the cockrel? Hope I didn't get this totally wrong. <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/blink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='blink' />
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#13
[quote name='Bantams&Quails' date='18 November 2010 - 09:29 PM' timestamp='1290115751' post='214961']

Jason, was there a cockrel in the pen when you picked up your chickens? Please someone who knows, isnt't it something like the hen will have fertilised eggs for some days after leaving the cockrel? Hope I didn't get this totally wrong. <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/blink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='blink' />

[/quote]

If there was a cock running with the hens, then yes, the eggs could be fertile for up to three weeks after they left him. IF and it's a big IF, he was fertile at the time.



Given it's the time they moult, not many boys are fertile at this time of the year.
You've only got one life - live it!
squizzers
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#14
Ok, <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/blushing.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':blushing:' /> I grew up near the mountains with only the odd wild (pig, goat, song bird or lizard) running around; I thought cockerels were always fertile until they died. <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/blush.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Blush' /> When else are they not fertile?



I only learned about pullets/cockerel and hen/cocks about a month ago. This forum is very educational.



Any other words of wisdom anyone can pass on? <img src='http://poultrychat.com/oldforumIcons/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Big Grin' />
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